For 2,632 consecutive games, Cal Ripken Jr. took the field, and for 21 years, he wowed fans at Memorial Stadium and then Camden Yards. For his next act as an Oriole, the Hall of Fame shortstop is expected to play an ownership role.

Ripken, who has become a businessperson in the years since his retirement from playing baseball in 2001, is expected to be part of the Orioles’ new ownership group, according to a source with direct knowledge of the agreement. The Angelos family has reached an agreement to sell the Orioles to private equity billionaire David Rubenstein, three sources with direct knowledge told The Baltimore Sun.

Major League Baseball previously encouraged Ripken to join an ownership group if the team were to be sold, sources told The Sun in 2022. A spokesman for Ripken did not reply to requests for comment Tuesday.

The Orioles have been owned by Peter Angelos since 1993 — a year that Ripken was named to one of his 19 All-Star teams — but legal documents from 2022 revealed that Angelos, who is 94 and has been in ailing health for years, wished for the team to be sold upon his death.

Angelos’ elder son, John Angelos, has been the team’s control person since 2020. Rubenstein is now set to take over as part of the deal, which values the team at $1.725 billion.

Rubenstein, a 74-year-old native of Baltimore and an alumnus of Baltimore City College, is a philanthropist and founder of the Carlyle Group, a private equity firm based in Washington.

Puck News was first to report the sale Tuesday evening. The Baltimore Banner was first to report Ripken’s involvement.

Ripken owns the Orioles’ High-A affiliate, the Aberdeen IronBirds, as well as the Ripken Experience, a youth baseball complex with locations across the country, including one in Aberdeen.

When asked at a news conference in 2007 whether he would be interested in hypothetically buying the Orioles, Ripken said, “Certainly if that ever became an opportunity, I certainly would look to be a part of that,” according to The Associated Press.

Ripken, 63, a Harford County native, is one of the most revered Orioles of all time and leads the club in career hits, most of which came during his games-played streak, which ran from 1982 to 1998. His father, Cal Sr., spent decades with the Orioles — rising from minor leaguer to manager — and his brother Bill played second base for the Orioles.

  • Cal Ripken Jr., former Baltimore Orioles player, is on the field before the game between the Baltimore Ravens and the Houston Texans in the Divisional Round of the playoffs at M&&T Bank Stadium.(Kenneth K. Lam/Staff photo)

  • Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. waves to the crowd...

    Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun

    Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. waves to the crowd during an Orioles game against the Yankees on April 7.

  • Cal Ripken Jr. hugs Brooks David Robinson following the public...

    Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun

    Cal Ripken Jr. hugs Brooks David Robinson following the public memorial service at Oriole Park for his father, legendary Orioles third baseman Brooks Robinson.

  • From left, James McCann talks with Jim Palmer, Cal Ripken...

    Barbara Haddock Taylor/Baltimore Sun

    From left, James McCann talks with Jim Palmer, Cal Ripken Jr. and Rick Dempsey after a ceremony to honor the 1983 Orioles World Series winning team.

  • Cal Ripken Jr.'s eponymous tournaments for youth baseball players have...

    DG/AP

    Cal Ripken Jr.’s eponymous tournaments for youth baseball players have merged with Cooperstown All Star Village under a new agreement with the owners of the Philadelphia 76ers and New Jersey Devils.

  • Cal Ripken Jr., left, and Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob...

    MATT BUTTON | RECORD STAFF / Baltimore Sun

    Cal Ripken Jr., left, and Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred talk on the field during the 2014 Cal Ripken World Series in Aberdeen.

  • Cal Ripken chats with Orioles' owner Peter Angelos prior to...

    Kenneth K. Lam / Baltimore Sun

    Cal Ripken chats with Orioles’ owner Peter Angelos prior to the start of the ceremonies celebrating his last game.

  • Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken is pictured at Camden Yards on...

    Lloyd Fox / Baltimore Sun

    Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken is pictured at Camden Yards on Sept. 6, 1995, the night he played in his 2,131st consecutive game, breaking Lou Gerhig’s major league record.

  • Cal Ripken Jr. rides in a car that was a...

    BALTIMORE SUN PHOTO BY LLOYD FOX

    Cal Ripken Jr. rides in a car that was a gift from his wife, after the 2,131 celebration.

  • Cal Ripken Jr. is flanked by his parents, Vi and...

    Gene Sweeney Jr. / BALTIMORE SUN

    Cal Ripken Jr. is flanked by his parents, Vi and Cal Sr., on the record-breaking night when he surpassed Lou Gehrig’s consecutive game streak.

  • Bill Ripken, Cal Ripken Sr. and Cal Ripken Jr. in...

    Gene Sweeney Jr / Baltimore Sun

    Bill Ripken, Cal Ripken Sr. and Cal Ripken Jr. in a 1987 photo from spring training.

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This year, Ripken Jr. was often seen at Camden Yards, witnessing one of the team’s best seasons in years from a front-row seat, and he spoke during an Oriole Park memorial for the late Brooks Robinson in October. Ripken told the crowd that, later in his career, when he moved from shortstop to third base, Robinson’s position, Ripken felt that was standing on “sacred ground.”

Earlier this month, he served as honorary captain when the Ravens hosted the Houston Texans in an NFL playoff game.

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